Get Out to Get In

Freebooters, Wyrdos, True Anarchs, and Third Wayers are hard to come by in a world run by market segmentation algorithms that bifurcate our reading and quoting circles into polarized echo chambers.

This is why in a world where most interaction is just a cacophony of noise and apology for various flavors and forms of scripts that serve the machine empire, the best companions are often the nonhuman.

I find my greatest companionship in wild spaces, feral zones, edges, and margins outside the grid of man, machine, city, church, institution, or state.

I use the machine, but I’m not owned or defined by it.

My ultimate reference point is higher, deeper, and much, much older.

To create a differentiated, unique, and conquering point of view that cuts a new trail through the jungle, you need to decolonize your mind and imagination. You need to open up new horizons beyond the logic and limits of the techno-sphere and the social grid woven by it.

The only way to do that is to get out into the wilds, and ultimately into the wilds of your own fully embodied imagination.

For a domesticated mind, this is scary and threatening.

This is why the word “Panic,” derived from the Great God Pan, was always associated with undomesticated wild spaces outside the City-States of the ancient world.

This is as true today as it was then. The unmediated immediacy of primal wild gnosis cannot be achieved in the matrix of the machine.

It’s only in the Wild Wood of Pan that you’ll find the inspiration for co-creating thriving resilient gardens that will outlive the machine as its gears grind toward entropy in the Anthropocene.

(Painting — Garden of Pan by Edward Burne-Jones)

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